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Yesterday, I finally got to find out if the list of grades, that I have to plonk on my CV, is a true reflection of all of the studying, sacrifices and late nights over the last 3 years.

I've learnt so much more in my time at my current school than a list of grades will ever show for and although, right now, the emotions are feeling pretty raw, I know that I will eventually come round to feeling that way. The idealistic part of me longs for perfection, whereas my voice of reason knows that I've achieved surplus to what I needed to. And that I should proudly wear my string of A*s.

My GCSE results were outstanding and I'm so proud of myself for getting through the whole ordeal. I hope that it went well for everyone else who were in the same boat. And if you didn't get what you wanted, know that these numbers don't define your potential.
In some subjects, I exceeded my expectations and did what feels like the impossible, so I'm over the moon with that. The most important thing however, is that these grades have opened a door for me and allow me to pursue the further education path that I've been aiming for.

So, what have I decided to do with these grades?

I've made the decision to do the International Baccalaureate Diploma over the English GCE A Levels. I personally feel like the breadth of the IB will allow me to continue to develop a variety of learning skills and styles, in a way that only a range of contrasting subjects can. I'm an all-rounder- always have been and it's important to me that my qualifications are a true reflection of my skill set.
If you weren't aware of the IB, it's a diploma that allows you to study 6 subjects, 3 at a higher level and 3 at standard level. The subjects are divided into different categories and you have to choose one subject in each category + more freedom for your sixth choice. Students are also required to do Creativity Action Service (CAS), an Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK). It is graded with a point system and you use it to apply to university in the same way that you would A Levels. I've linked the IB website here if you want to find out more about it.



After hours of deliberation and the painful struggle that was bidding farewell to so many subjects that I adore, I've finally decided which subjects I'm going to do in sixth form (although, that might change once I start school in September...).
My subject choices:
HL English Literature, French & Biology
SL Geography, Philosophy, Maths

I can't wait to embark on this new journey, which I've been told will fly by incredibly quickly; so I'm going to try to make the most of everyday and keep looking forwards.

My Results & Academic Future


Yesterday, I finally got to find out if the list of grades, that I have to plonk on my CV, is a true reflection of all of the studying, sacrifices and late nights over the last 3 years.

I've learnt so much more in my time at my current school than a list of grades will ever show for and although, right now, the emotions are feeling pretty raw, I know that I will eventually come round to feeling that way. The idealistic part of me longs for perfection, whereas my voice of reason knows that I've achieved surplus to what I needed to. And that I should proudly wear my string of A*s.

My GCSE results were outstanding and I'm so proud of myself for getting through the whole ordeal. I hope that it went well for everyone else who were in the same boat. And if you didn't get what you wanted, know that these numbers don't define your potential.
In some subjects, I exceeded my expectations and did what feels like the impossible, so I'm over the moon with that. The most important thing however, is that these grades have opened a door for me and allow me to pursue the further education path that I've been aiming for.

So, what have I decided to do with these grades?

I've made the decision to do the International Baccalaureate Diploma over the English GCE A Levels. I personally feel like the breadth of the IB will allow me to continue to develop a variety of learning skills and styles, in a way that only a range of contrasting subjects can. I'm an all-rounder- always have been and it's important to me that my qualifications are a true reflection of my skill set.
If you weren't aware of the IB, it's a diploma that allows you to study 6 subjects, 3 at a higher level and 3 at standard level. The subjects are divided into different categories and you have to choose one subject in each category + more freedom for your sixth choice. Students are also required to do Creativity Action Service (CAS), an Extended Essay (EE) and Theory of Knowledge (TOK). It is graded with a point system and you use it to apply to university in the same way that you would A Levels. I've linked the IB website here if you want to find out more about it.



After hours of deliberation and the painful struggle that was bidding farewell to so many subjects that I adore, I've finally decided which subjects I'm going to do in sixth form (although, that might change once I start school in September...).
My subject choices:
HL English Literature, French & Biology
SL Geography, Philosophy, Maths

I can't wait to embark on this new journey, which I've been told will fly by incredibly quickly; so I'm going to try to make the most of everyday and keep looking forwards.

So I've been sat here, waiting for the GCSE results day anxiety to kick in so that I can write a witty and relatable blog post, but I've left it as long as possible and am yet to feel worried about it. It's the night before the much anticipated day, yet it feels no different to any other day.
I just want to be truthful about it all.
So instead of rambling or gloating about how calm I feel, or trying to relate to those of you out there in the same situation as me, I just want to wish all of you who are getting your results tomorrow a good night's sleep. I hope that you will be in the position that you wanted to be in tomorrow. And I believe that we'll all end up on the path that we're supposed to be on. I'm looking forward to the future. Good luck!

Anticipation: Pre-GCSE Results


So I've been sat here, waiting for the GCSE results day anxiety to kick in so that I can write a witty and relatable blog post, but I've left it as long as possible and am yet to feel worried about it. It's the night before the much anticipated day, yet it feels no different to any other day.
I just want to be truthful about it all.
So instead of rambling or gloating about how calm I feel, or trying to relate to those of you out there in the same situation as me, I just want to wish all of you who are getting your results tomorrow a good night's sleep. I hope that you will be in the position that you wanted to be in tomorrow. And I believe that we'll all end up on the path that we're supposed to be on. I'm looking forward to the future. Good luck!

I just got back from Geneva and wow...what a way to kick off 2019. I've spent a week hiking through the snow, conversing in French and meeting so many incredible people who have given me a lot to reflect on and have undeniably shaped the person that I want to become. For the first time, I felt 16- I got to be the person who I've always wanted to be at this stage in my life and I'm going forward with her 'can-do' attitude and lack of stress. By taking part in exchanges, I've learnt, not only so much about other cultures, but also about myself.
I've been fortunate enough to host 4 exchange students (although, not at the same time) whilst I've been at my current school and I've loved doing it even more than I'd initially expected. I've always been really open to the idea and have always seen it in a positive light. However, I've watched my school struggle to find enough hosts for every exchange. 
Occasionally, I think it might be a cultural difference between my household and other families here, as I find that my creole side of the family are much more willing to open their home to people and will always put you up if you're visiting.
Many people that I go to school with have said that they wouldn't want to go to another country and live in someone else's house...and fair enough, that's completely justified. But, I've found that hosting students is just as rewarding so I wanted to share the things I learnt from my experiences of hosting a foreign exchange student.

Language isn't a barrier unless you make it one
I hosted a lovely and incredibly funny Italian girl whilst she was in England for a debating competition. Bear in mind, not one member of my immediate family knows a word of Italian, other than 'ciao'. You can still have a connection with someone even if they speak broken English (or vice versa) and I've never cried so much with laughter with anybody else.

There's more than one way to do something right
Sounds pretty straightforward, but what I mean by that subheading is that: you can have the same core values as someone else, but can live them and articulate them in completely different ways. It makes you so much more aware of the lifestyle choices that you have.

My Hugh Grant moment (bookish Brit meets the lovable American)
Now, everyone knows that English people aren't the most comfortable about talking about taboo issues- or anything remotely personal for that matter (hence the constant talking about the weather and drinking tea so we don't have to have a proper conversation). But when I hosted C. (we'll call her that), an American living in Canada, I had never felt so at ease with a new person. I felt like I could be myself straight way and I realised that I don't have to be reserved with people when I first meet them.
We ended up talking about things that I daren't discuss with my friends and (as a 13-year-old girl at the time) without any sisters, it was eye-opening and comforting to be able to openly talk to a 16-year-old who had experienced more than me. At the time, I saw her as the teenage girl I'd grown up seeing in movies and she became a massive role model for me. She has so much confidence and just radiates joy- I loved every second with her because it was like having an older sister or cousin with me. I owe so much to her because, as my first exchange partner, she gave me the confidence to keep putting myself out there.

You have to be confident enough to make mistakes
There's no other way to learn a language, you can't be too afraid to try and say sentences that you've never said before or get hung up about perfect grammar. This is something that I realised on my most recent exchange, I'm passionate about French and learning languages and because of that, I was initially scared to make mistakes- in a sort of protective way. I got over that though...and I'm so glad about it because it made everything twice as enjoyable.

You never know who you're going to meet and what you're going to learn, and that's half the fun of it.

What I've learnt from my exchange students


I just got back from Geneva and wow...what a way to kick off 2019. I've spent a week hiking through the snow, conversing in French and meeting so many incredible people who have given me a lot to reflect on and have undeniably shaped the person that I want to become. For the first time, I felt 16- I got to be the person who I've always wanted to be at this stage in my life and I'm going forward with her 'can-do' attitude and lack of stress. By taking part in exchanges, I've learnt, not only so much about other cultures, but also about myself.
I've been fortunate enough to host 4 exchange students (although, not at the same time) whilst I've been at my current school and I've loved doing it even more than I'd initially expected. I've always been really open to the idea and have always seen it in a positive light. However, I've watched my school struggle to find enough hosts for every exchange. 
Occasionally, I think it might be a cultural difference between my household and other families here, as I find that my creole side of the family are much more willing to open their home to people and will always put you up if you're visiting.
Many people that I go to school with have said that they wouldn't want to go to another country and live in someone else's house...and fair enough, that's completely justified. But, I've found that hosting students is just as rewarding so I wanted to share the things I learnt from my experiences of hosting a foreign exchange student.

Language isn't a barrier unless you make it one
I hosted a lovely and incredibly funny Italian girl whilst she was in England for a debating competition. Bear in mind, not one member of my immediate family knows a word of Italian, other than 'ciao'. You can still have a connection with someone even if they speak broken English (or vice versa) and I've never cried so much with laughter with anybody else.

There's more than one way to do something right
Sounds pretty straightforward, but what I mean by that subheading is that: you can have the same core values as someone else, but can live them and articulate them in completely different ways. It makes you so much more aware of the lifestyle choices that you have.

My Hugh Grant moment (bookish Brit meets the lovable American)
Now, everyone knows that English people aren't the most comfortable about talking about taboo issues- or anything remotely personal for that matter (hence the constant talking about the weather and drinking tea so we don't have to have a proper conversation). But when I hosted C. (we'll call her that), an American living in Canada, I had never felt so at ease with a new person. I felt like I could be myself straight way and I realised that I don't have to be reserved with people when I first meet them.
We ended up talking about things that I daren't discuss with my friends and (as a 13-year-old girl at the time) without any sisters, it was eye-opening and comforting to be able to openly talk to a 16-year-old who had experienced more than me. At the time, I saw her as the teenage girl I'd grown up seeing in movies and she became a massive role model for me. She has so much confidence and just radiates joy- I loved every second with her because it was like having an older sister or cousin with me. I owe so much to her because, as my first exchange partner, she gave me the confidence to keep putting myself out there.

You have to be confident enough to make mistakes
There's no other way to learn a language, you can't be too afraid to try and say sentences that you've never said before or get hung up about perfect grammar. This is something that I realised on my most recent exchange, I'm passionate about French and learning languages and because of that, I was initially scared to make mistakes- in a sort of protective way. I got over that though...and I'm so glad about it because it made everything twice as enjoyable.

You never know who you're going to meet and what you're going to learn, and that's half the fun of it.



Why is it that direct-messaging a stranger and asking for their Snapchat username is now seen as an effective and acceptable way to flirt with somebody? 

Forbid that a teenage girl in 2018 actually prefers good-manners, romance and face-to-face interaction over 'sliding into DMs'. Call me old-fashioned as much as you want but there is no way that I'll even attempt to start a relationship with anybody online.

It's no news that my generation is one that is growing up on social media platforms (it's also no news that we are probably the last people who did not own an iPad at age 4 - the best of both worlds?). What's so wrong with being behind the times if that means that I won't reply to the same generic Joey-esque "how you doin'?" message notification, that pops up on my phone in the very early hours of the morning. A message that has so obviously been sent around to just about every other 14-16 year old girl in the local area that the sender can find on Instagram.

Attempting to start a relationship used to be about making someone feel 'special' and making them feel as if you've seen the 'real' them. Lately, I've had a couple of interactions with boys online who have showered me with heart-eyed emojis, 'x's and other meaningless tat and honestly, I don't know how anybody can expect an emotional response from any of that- even if the compliments they are typing are actually nice. Asking for my Snapchat, presumably so they can send me inappropriate snaps, will in not render me speechless with desire nor will it strike me dumbfound with love.

However, so many people are in long lasting relationships (well as long as they can be for mere 15 year olds), which occasionally makes me wonder if us hopeless romantics have had their day and are destined to die alone because we struggle to adapt to this lack of emotion that we are all now expected to find alluring. I must clarify that being a distant Mr Rochester is very different from being lazy teenager who actually only thinks that you're not repulsive, so they might as well pop-up. Of course, just to make sure that they're not putting all of their eggs into one basket.

Fifteen year-olds are far too young for Tinder and other dating apps so I'm by no means pointing the finger of blame. I'm just so confused as to when things shifted and I was supposed to find "what's you snapchat? x" an irresistible opening line...

Social media gives us all the ability to hide behind an online persona. We become outgoing and we do things we wouldn't dream of doing offline: that is when people lose all the things that make them genuine. A lack of sincerity and authenticity means that nothing about their personality and qualities comes across. So no thanks, to new age flirting.

New Age Flirting



Why is it that direct-messaging a stranger and asking for their Snapchat username is now seen as an effective and acceptable way to flirt with somebody? 

Forbid that a teenage girl in 2018 actually prefers good-manners, romance and face-to-face interaction over 'sliding into DMs'. Call me old-fashioned as much as you want but there is no way that I'll even attempt to start a relationship with anybody online.

It's no news that my generation is one that is growing up on social media platforms (it's also no news that we are probably the last people who did not own an iPad at age 4 - the best of both worlds?). What's so wrong with being behind the times if that means that I won't reply to the same generic Joey-esque "how you doin'?" message notification, that pops up on my phone in the very early hours of the morning. A message that has so obviously been sent around to just about every other 14-16 year old girl in the local area that the sender can find on Instagram.

Attempting to start a relationship used to be about making someone feel 'special' and making them feel as if you've seen the 'real' them. Lately, I've had a couple of interactions with boys online who have showered me with heart-eyed emojis, 'x's and other meaningless tat and honestly, I don't know how anybody can expect an emotional response from any of that- even if the compliments they are typing are actually nice. Asking for my Snapchat, presumably so they can send me inappropriate snaps, will in not render me speechless with desire nor will it strike me dumbfound with love.

However, so many people are in long lasting relationships (well as long as they can be for mere 15 year olds), which occasionally makes me wonder if us hopeless romantics have had their day and are destined to die alone because we struggle to adapt to this lack of emotion that we are all now expected to find alluring. I must clarify that being a distant Mr Rochester is very different from being lazy teenager who actually only thinks that you're not repulsive, so they might as well pop-up. Of course, just to make sure that they're not putting all of their eggs into one basket.

Fifteen year-olds are far too young for Tinder and other dating apps so I'm by no means pointing the finger of blame. I'm just so confused as to when things shifted and I was supposed to find "what's you snapchat? x" an irresistible opening line...

Social media gives us all the ability to hide behind an online persona. We become outgoing and we do things we wouldn't dream of doing offline: that is when people lose all the things that make them genuine. A lack of sincerity and authenticity means that nothing about their personality and qualities comes across. So no thanks, to new age flirting.


This year, my aim is to finish 20 books. That may not sound like a lot to some but with a busy and stressful GCSE year ahead of me, I want to keep it realistic. I cherish the joy that reading brings but like many others, I often neglect to make time for it. I'm no book-blogger or bookstagrammer and many of them have goals of reading 50-100 books. This years focus, for me, is to read powerful, influential and challenging books rather than reading a large quantity of books that I won't remember or help me grow as a person. I've had a slow start with but I'm sure I'll catch up after my exams.

Current read: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. 
I'm not a 30-minutes-a-day reader, I'd much rather devote a day to devouring a good book. You know a book is good when it is found glued to my hand. Also, I can't comprehend how people read in busy, public places!- I could never read on a bus (I get travel-sick anyway).

By setting a goal on a number of books I'm giving myself the best motivation I can come up with. It's not motivation to read a book, it's motivation to make more time for reading and all of the other things that I enjoy. 

Books I want to read next:

  • The Girl on the Train
  • The Kite Runner
  • Beloved
  • Thérèse Raquin
  • L'Étranger (in french)
  • The Little Prince
  • Around the world in 80 days (in french)

Lately, I've also started following a number of bookstagram accounts (book-instagrams) for some inspiration- I only really follow a few: some big, some smaller. Here's 5 that I love and are somewhere to start if you're an absolute newbie like me:

@obviousstate
@bookbento

@wordsr_worlds

@empire.of.a.lost.soul

Please leave a comment of any books that you've enjoyed and would recommend :)

2018 Reading Goal


This year, my aim is to finish 20 books. That may not sound like a lot to some but with a busy and stressful GCSE year ahead of me, I want to keep it realistic. I cherish the joy that reading brings but like many others, I often neglect to make time for it. I'm no book-blogger or bookstagrammer and many of them have goals of reading 50-100 books. This years focus, for me, is to read powerful, influential and challenging books rather than reading a large quantity of books that I won't remember or help me grow as a person. I've had a slow start with but I'm sure I'll catch up after my exams.

Current read: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. 
I'm not a 30-minutes-a-day reader, I'd much rather devote a day to devouring a good book. You know a book is good when it is found glued to my hand. Also, I can't comprehend how people read in busy, public places!- I could never read on a bus (I get travel-sick anyway).

By setting a goal on a number of books I'm giving myself the best motivation I can come up with. It's not motivation to read a book, it's motivation to make more time for reading and all of the other things that I enjoy. 

Books I want to read next:

  • The Girl on the Train
  • The Kite Runner
  • Beloved
  • Thérèse Raquin
  • L'Étranger (in french)
  • The Little Prince
  • Around the world in 80 days (in french)

Lately, I've also started following a number of bookstagram accounts (book-instagrams) for some inspiration- I only really follow a few: some big, some smaller. Here's 5 that I love and are somewhere to start if you're an absolute newbie like me:

@obviousstate
@bookbento

@wordsr_worlds

@empire.of.a.lost.soul

Please leave a comment of any books that you've enjoyed and would recommend :)

Enveloped in thick duvets, furry throws and woollen blankets to the point where it's impossible to tell where my pyjamas start and socks end. I've consumed approximately 27 digestive biscuits and heaven knows how many cups of tea whilst watching 'The Holiday'. Perhaps one of the most uneventful events of 2018 so far but definitely my favourite.

I wouldn't have thought that whirls of powdery snow could make such a difference to my mood which seems to have stayed unchanged for weeks. Perhaps a (somewhat rare) change of routine is what I need. A day where nothing else matter but hot drinks and snowmen. A perfect excuse for turtlenecks, scarves, eating too much and not doing anything that productive- without guilt.

I think that it's not actually the frozen water at all- it's the rarity of simple childish pleasures amongst the monotonous days that some of us have grown accustomed to. It crossed my mind to wish for at least one snow day a week, but then I remembered that with each one, a little bit of magic would be lost.

I better go, the kettle has finished boiling...

Snow Day


Enveloped in thick duvets, furry throws and woollen blankets to the point where it's impossible to tell where my pyjamas start and socks end. I've consumed approximately 27 digestive biscuits and heaven knows how many cups of tea whilst watching 'The Holiday'. Perhaps one of the most uneventful events of 2018 so far but definitely my favourite.

I wouldn't have thought that whirls of powdery snow could make such a difference to my mood which seems to have stayed unchanged for weeks. Perhaps a (somewhat rare) change of routine is what I need. A day where nothing else matter but hot drinks and snowmen. A perfect excuse for turtlenecks, scarves, eating too much and not doing anything that productive- without guilt.

I think that it's not actually the frozen water at all- it's the rarity of simple childish pleasures amongst the monotonous days that some of us have grown accustomed to. It crossed my mind to wish for at least one snow day a week, but then I remembered that with each one, a little bit of magic would be lost.

I better go, the kettle has finished boiling...

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